Showing posts with label Schneider Electric. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Schneider Electric. Show all posts

Measuring Water and Liquid Level in Narrow, Obstructed Tanks with 80 GHz Non-Contact Radar Technology

80GHz Level Sensor

The Foxboro Schneider Electric 80 GHz Radar (FMCW) Level Transmitter is ideal for measuring level of water and other liquids liquids in narrow tanks with internal obstructions.

The Schneider Electric (Foxboro) LR75 is a non-contact radar level transmitter that uses FMCW technology. It measures distance, level and volume of liquids and pastes. It has an empty spectrum function that filters false reflections caused by equipment inside the tank.

  • LR75 Free Space Radar
  • 80 GHz FMCW technology
  • cQPSus XP
  • 4 -20mA /HART® 7
  • 1/2" NPT Cable Entry
  • Backlit Display
  • (-14.5..580 psig) I (-40 deg F to +302 F) / FKM/FPM Process Seal
  • 1-1/2“ DN40 Lens Antenna
  • 1-1/2“ NPT ASME Process Connection
  • Very low cost of ownership

For more information, contact Mead O'Brien. Call them at 800-892-2769 or visit their website at https://meadobrien.com.

Radar Level: The Relationship Between Frequency and Beam Angle and Using Beam Angle Calculators


Radar is the preferred technology for level measurement in many of today’s industrial applications. Selecting the best microwave frequency transmitted by the device for your application is crucial, and understanding the relationship between frequency and beam angle is very important.

In this video, Jeff Blair, Offer Manager for level products at Schneider Electric, presents the difference in beam angle at various frequencies and how to use Beam Angle Calculators to determine beam width at various levels in a tank.

For more information about radar level instrumentation, contact Mead O'Brien. Call them at (800) 892-2769 or visit their website at https://meadobrien.com.

The Schneider Electric Foxboro CFT51 Digital Coriolis Mass Flow and Density Transmitter with HART or Modbus Communication Protocol


The Schneider Foxboro Model CFT51 Digital Coriolis Mass Flow and Density transmitter is an advanced generation of mass flow devices using DSP (digital signal processing) technology, which allows this transmitter to provide improved performance over other Coriolis flowmeters. This mass flow and density meter, comprising a CFT51 mass flow and density transmitter and a Foxboro CFS mass flowtube, measures fluid mass flow rate directly, not inferentially. Direct measurement of mass helps eliminate the inaccuracies of multiple process measurements associated with volumetric flow devices.


For more information, contact Mead O'Brien. Call them at  (800) 892-2769 or visit their web site at https://meadobrien.com.

Configuration and Setting the Schneider Electric / Foxboro IMT30A Magnetic Flow Signal Converter

This video below provides instruction on setting the Schneider Electric / Foxboro Model IMT30A.

The electromagnetic signal converter IMT30A is a used for measuring volumetric flow in various kinds of applications that can be found in the water industry and food and beverage processing. The IMT30A can be used together with Foxboro flow sensors 8400A, 8500A, 9500A, 9600A and 9700A with outputs representing measured values for flow, mass and conductivity.

Industries
  • Water & Wastewater
  • Food & Beverage
  • Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC)
  • Agriculture
  • Steel
Applications
  • Water and wastewater treatment Water distribution network Irrigation installation
  • Water abstraction
  • CIP cleaning stations
https://meadobrien.com
(800) 892-2769

Understanding Vortex Shedding Flow Technology

Foxboro Vortex Shedding Flowmeter
Foxboro Vortex Shedding Flowmeter.
Notice the shedder bar in the flow path.
Photograph of vortice
Photograph of vortices
(credit Jürgen Wagner via Wikipedia)
Vortex shedding flowmeters are a type of flowmeter available to the process industry for the consistent evaluation of flow rates. These flowmeters measure the volumetric flow rate of media such as steam flowing in pipes, gases, and low viscosity liquids, boasting both versatility and dependability. Since they have no moving parts, they are impervious to the kind of wear turbine or mechanical meters experience.

Principles of Operation
A "shedder" bar (also known as a bluff body) in the path of
Animation of vortex creation
Animation of vortices
(credit Cesareo de La Rosa Siqueira
via Wikipedia)
the flowing fluid produces flow disturbances called vortices. The resulting vortex trail is predictable and proportional to the fluid flow rate. This phenomena is know as the "Von Kármán vortex street" (see illustrations to the right). Sensitive electronic sensors downstream of the shedder bar measures the frequency of the vortices and produce a small electrical pulse with every vortex created. The electrical pulses also also proportional to fluid velocity and is the basis for calculating a volumetric flow rate, using the cross sectional area of the flow measuring device.

Typical Areas of Use
Vortex shedding flowmeters are used on steam, cryogenic liquids, hydrocarbons, air, feed water, and industrial gases.

Applications to Avoid
Splitting higher viscosity fluids into concordant vertices is extremely difficult due to the internal friction present, so using vortex shedding flowmeters on high viscosity media should be avoided. Also, avoid applications with low flow rates and low Reynolds Numbers, as the vortices created are unstable.

Consideration for Use
Consideration must be given to applications with low Reynolds numbers, as the generation of vortices declines at critical points of reduced velocity. Low pressure can also be a problem in this regard. Users must take Reynolds number, velocity, and density into consideration before choosing a vortex shedding flow meter. As always, it's best to discuss your application with an knowledgable support professional before specifying, purchasing, or installing this type of flowmeter.

Watch the video below for more information on vortex flow technology.


For more information on  vortex shedding flowmeters, visit https://www.meadobrien.com or call (800) 892-2769.

What are Magnetic Flowmeters and How Do They Work?

Magnetic Flowmeter
Magnetic Flowmeter
(courtesy of Foxboro Schneider Electric)
Crucial aspects of process control include the ability to accurately determine qualities and quantities of materials. In terms of appraising and working with fluids (such as liquids, steam, and gases) the flowmeter is a staple tool, with the simple goal of expressing the delivery of a subject fluid in a quantified manner. Measurement of media flow velocity can be used, along with other conditions, to determine volumetric or mass flow. The magnetic flowmeter, also called a magmeter, is one of several technologies used to measure fluid flow.

In general, magnetic flowmeters are sturdy, reliable devices able to withstand hazardous environments while returning precise measurements to operators of a wide variety of processes. The magnetic flowmeter has no moving parts. The operational principle of the device is powered by Faraday's Law, a fundamental scientific understanding which states that a voltage will be induced across any conductor moving at a right angle through a magnetic field, with the voltage being proportional to the velocity of the conductor. The principle allows for an inherently hard-to-measure quality of a substance to be expressed via the magmeter. In a magmeter application, the meter produces the magnetic field referred to in Faraday's Law. The conductor is the fluid. The actual measurement of a magnetic flowmeter is the induced voltage corresponding to fluid velocity. This can be used to determine volumetric flow and mass flow when combined with other measurements.  

The magnetic flowmeter technology is not impacted by temperature, pressure, or density of the subject fluid. It is however, necessary to fill the entire cross section of the pipe in order to derive useful volumetric flow measurements. Faraday's Law relies on conductivity, so the fluid being measured has to be electrically conductive. Many hydrocarbons are not sufficiently conductive for a flow measurement using this method, nor are gases.

Magnetic Flowmeter and transmitter
Magnetic Flowmeter and controller.
(courtesy of Foxboro Schneider Electric)
Magmeters apply Faraday's law by using two charged magnetic coils; fluid passes through the magnetic field produced by the coils. A precise measurement of the voltage generated in the fluid will be proportional to fluid velocity. The relationship between voltage and flow is theoretically a linear expression, yet some outside factors may present barriers and complications in the interaction of the instrument with the subject fluid. These complications include a higher amount of voltage in the liquid being processed, and coupling issues between the signal circuit, power source, and/or connective leads of both an inductive and capacitive nature.

In addition to salient factors such as price, accuracy, ease of use, and the size-scale of the flowmeter in relation to the fluid system, there are multiple reasons why magmeters are the unit of choice for certain applications. They are resistant to corrosion, and can provide accurate measurement of dirty fluids ñ making them suitable for wastewater measurement. As mentioned, there are no moving parts in a magmeter, keeping maintenance to a minimum. Power requirements are also low. Instruments are available in a wide range of configurations, sizes, and construction materials to accommodate various process installation requirements. 

As with all process measurement instruments, proper selection, configuration, and installation are the real keys to a successful project. Share your flow measurement challenges of all types with a process measurement specialist, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.

Enhancing Cyber Security in Industrial Control Systems and Critical Infrastructure with Dynamic Endpoint Modeling

A white paper courtesy of Schneider Electric (Foxboro)

Cyber attacks against Industrial Control Systems (ICS) are on the rise, putting nations’ critical infrastructure at risk. In a paradigm shift from the traditional network security systems, a new approach — Dynamic Endpoint Modeling — learns and models the behavior of all devices on the network and triggers alerts when algorithms detect changes in learned behavior.

Read the entire white paper below.

Choose Guided Wave Radar for Your Challenging Process Level Application

Guided Wave Radar transmitters (GWR)
Guided Wave
Radar Transmitter
Courtesy of
Foxboro/Schneider
Electric
Designed to perform continuous level measurement in a wide range of industries and applications, Guided Wave Radar transmitters (GWR) are unaffected by changes in temperature, specific gravity, pressure and with no need to recalibrate, offering a highly available measurement at low maintenance cost. GWR transmitters provide level measurement solutions in a variety of process applications, providing a universal radar measurement solution for all liquids including corrosive, viscous, sticky and other difficult media such as foam and turbulent surfaces, and solids.

Electromagnetic pulses are emitted and guided along a probe.  These pulses are reflected back at the product surface.  The distance is calculated by measuring this transit time. This device is perfect for high-end applications.  It is suitable for applications with foam, dust, vapor, agitated, turbulent or boiling surfaces with rapid level changes.

Common features include:
Easy configuration via digital communication; Wide selection of materials facilitates service under harsh/corrosive conditions; Solutions for density/pressure variations and rapid level changes; Empty Tank Spectrum filtering; Quick Noise scanning reduces false radar reflections.

Applications: Steam Generation /Boiler Drum; Oil/Water Separator; BioDiesel Production; Overflow Protection; Interface and Density; Process tanks; Storage tanks; Polyester/Nylon fiber production; Claus Process


For more information on Guided Wave Radar level instruments, contact:

Mead O'Brien
(800) 892-2769
www.meadobrien.com