Showing posts with label pressure gauges. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pressure gauges. Show all posts

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Five Important Criteria in Applying Pressure Gauges

Ashcroft pressure gauge
Process pressure gauge.
(Ashcroft)
Pressure gauges are installed in countless industrial and commercial applications around the world. From hygienic pharmaceutical process lines, to the most unpleasant and hostile areas in chemical, power, and food processing plants.

While there are millions of possible combinations of shapes, sizes, options and materials, pressure gauges all share the five  following application criteria, required for safe use and long product life.
Ashcroft diaphragm seal
Diaphragm seal.
(Ashcroft)


1 - Process Media Properties: Media that is corrosive, sludgy, or that can solidify is a potential problem for pressure gauges. In non-corrosive, non-clogging media applications, a direct connection without intermediate protection can be applied. For process media that could potentially clog or chemically affect the gauge's wetted parts, a diaphragm seal should be used.

2 - Process Media Temperature: Very hot media, such as steam or hot water, can elevate the gauge's internal temperature leading to failure or an unsafe condition. For high temperature applications, the use of a "pigtail siphon" or diaphragm seal is recommended. Siphons act as a heat sink and lower the exposure temperature. Diaphragm seals isolate the gauge from the higher temperatures.

Siphon
Pigtail siphon.
3 - Ambient Operating Temperature and Environment: It is important to know the ambient environmental rating for any process instrument. Elevated ambient temperatures, moisture, vibration, and corrosive atmospheres can all affect accuracy, calibration, and safety. Choose the proper housing and mechanism materials if oxidizing or reducing atmospheres exist, and consider the addition of ancillary devices, such as remote diaphragm seals to physically relocate the gauge away from the hostile area.

Snubber
Snubber
4 - Severe Pressure Fluctuations: In applications where dramatic line pulsations or strong over-pressure conditions are a possibility, the use of pressure restrictors, snubbers, or liquid-filled gauges will extend the service life of the pressure gauge.

5 - Mounting: Pressure gauges are standardly available with bottom (radial) and back connections. NPT (National Pipe Thread Taper) threaded connections are generally the standard. Many other process connections are available though, such as straight threads, metric threads, and specialized fittings. Make sure you know how the gauge is being connected. When mounting, pressure gauges should be almost always be mounted upright.

For more information about pressure gauges, contact Mead O'Brien by visiting https://meadobrien.com or by calling (800) 892-2769.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Ashcroft Materials Compatibility and Corrosion Guide

Ashcroft products
Ashcroft products.
Below is a very good materials compatibility and corrosion guide courtesy of Ashcroft.

The reference is intended to serve solely as a general guide in the recommendation of materials for corrosive services and must be regarded as indicative only and not as any guarantee for a specific service.  There are many conditions which cannot be covered by a simple tabulation such as this, which is based on uncontaminated chemicals, not mixtures.

Many of the chemicals listed are dangerous or toxic.  No material recommendation should be made when there is insufficient information, a high degree of risk, or an extremely dangerous chemical.  The end user is responsible for testing materials in his own application, or for securing the services of a qualified engineer to recommend materials.

The end user is responsible for the choice of product(s) in his own application, based upon his own determination of the materials, chemical, and corrosion factors involved. THIS GUIDE AND ITS CONTENT ARE PROVIDED ON AN “AS IS" BASIS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND.

You can refer to the embedded document below, or you can download your Ashcroft Corrosion Guide PDF from this link.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Dampening the Effects of Vibration on Industrial Pressure Gauges

Pressure gauge
Vibration must be considered
when applying pressure gauges.
Pressure gauges rely on precise and responsive mechanisms to display changes in system pressure as rotational needle movement. By their very nature, these mechanisms are responsive to pulsations within the pressurized system and vibrations that may be evident in the connected piping and structures. The effect of vibration and pulsation is seen as an indicating pointer oscillating rapidly, making a definitive or even useful reading impossible. One solution, applied traditionally, was to fill the gauge with a viscous liquid that would dampen the rapid oscillation of the indicating needle.

While a liquid filled gauge does solve the oscillation problem, it does have a drawback. The liquid in the gauge presents its own set of operational issues requiring consideration in any application.

Provision should be made to check and maintain the liquid level in the gauge
A liquid filled gauge is an additional source of potential leakage in a facility

Ashcroft, a globally recognized manufacturer of gauges for commercial, industrial, and laboratory use, offers a different solution that provides the deflection dampening of a liquid gauge without liquid fill. Available on many of their gauges, the "Plus" option enables stable gauge face display in a dry gauge.

The video below provides a side by side demonstration of a liquid filled and a Plus gauge, so you can see the performance of both types. Share your process gauge requirements and challenges with instrumentation experts, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.