Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Using a Valve Monitor for Tank Fill Control

Tank fill application
Tank fill application using a StoneL Axiom
Expeditor
to throttle flow.
Fill tanks and hoppers rapidly and accurately using the StoneL Axiom Expeditor valve monitor on a pneumatically operated valve.

You can set the Axiom Expeditor to partially close the valve to reduce flow as the full level approaches. You get fast, economical “topping off” of every batch with a single valve sized for high flow rates, which may be throttled back at the end of the fill cycle.


Simple operation and control system integration
  • Full open and closed cycling is performed by energizing and de-energizing the discrete 24 VDC output (DO) from the control system.
  • A preset intermediate position may be achieved by maintaining power from the discrete output (DO) and switching on the analog output (AO) at a preset level between 4 and 20 mA.
  • Intermediate control is achieved by maintaining power from the discrete output (DO) and energizing the control system’s analog output (AO). By changing the AO signal, the Axiom control output will toggle the solenoids to the desired position within ±4% of full scale.
  • The valve/actuator operates to the fail-safe position whenever the discrete output (DO) is de-energized.
Schematic for tank fill application
Schematic for tank fill application showing control inputs/outputs.
Watch this short video illustrating how the tank fill feature works.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

BIST (Built-in-Self-Test) Features for Electronic Valve Actuators

Limitorque
Electric actuator (Limittorque)
Abstract

The development and implementation of safety related devices in plant systems is crucial for dependable operation, not to mention peace of mind. Safety and safe operation were once only high priorities for installations that involve hazardous environments. Expensive certification testing was, and still is, paramount to meeting the hazards of such environments, but a new level of plant-wide integrity is emerging — that of Safety Integrity Level (SIL) and SIS. SIL is a safety rating that can be derived by analyzing a system to determine the risk of a failure occurring and the severity of its consequences. Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are systems containing instrumentation or controls installed for the purpose of preventing or mitigating a failure either by emergency shut down (ESD) or diverting the hazard. New or replacement equipment must have the ability to be introduced into plant systems without jeopardizing either the SIL of the operation or negatively impacting the SIS.

Read the entire white paper below.

For more information visit this link or contact:

Mead O'Brien
www.meadobrien.com
(800) 892-2769

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Understanding & Solving Heat Transfer Equipment Stall

heat transfer equipment
Heat transfer loop
Stall can most easily be defined as a condition in which heat transfer equipment is unable to drain condensate and becomes flooded due to insufficient system pressure.

Stall occurs primarily in heat transfer equipment where the steam pressure is modulated to obtain a desired output (i.e. product temperature). The pressure range of any such equipment ( coils, shell & tube, etc....) can be segmented into two (2) distinct operational modes, Operating and Stall.

Operating: In the upper section of the pressure range the operating pressure (OP) of the equipment is greater than the back pressure (BP) present at the discharge of the steam trap. Therefore a positive pressure differential across the trap exists allowing for condensate to flow from the equipment to the condensate return line.

Stall: In the lower section of the pressure range the operating pressure (OP) of the equipment is less than or equal to the back pressure (BP) present at the discharge of the steam trap. Therefore a negative or no pressure differential exists, this does not allow condensate to be discharged to the return line and the condensate begins to collect and flood the equipment.

You can read the entire Armstrong technical paper below.

Visit this link to download your own copy of Armstrong Fluid Handling: Understanding and Solving Equipment Stall.

Friday, August 12, 2016

Applying the ASCO 212 Composite Solenoid Valve for Reverse Osmosis Water Systems

ASCO Mead O'Brien Series 212
ASCO Series 212 Composite Solenoid Valves
for Reverse Osmosis Water Systems
Reverse osmosis (RO) is one of the most popular methods for effective water purification. It has been used for years to purify contaminated water, including converting brackish or seawater to drinking water.

Reverse osmosis is a process in which dissolved inorganic solids (such as salts) are removed from a solution (such as water). This is accomplished by pushing the water through a semi permeable membrane, which allows only the water to pass, but not the impurities or contaminates.

Reverse Osmosis can deliver bottled-water quality safety and taste by removing over 99% of dissolved minerals, chlorine and contaminants. Many leading bottled-water companies actually use large-scale RO to produce their water.

Reverse osmosis systems are found in several drinking water applications from restaurant, food and beverage equipment to grocery store produce misting.

The ASCO Series 212 solenoid valve is designed for these type systems. The valves come with NSF approvals for use in drinking water systems and also is design with unique “FasN” quick connection system. The valves are designed to handle 150 psi up to 180 deg. F. and has low wattage coils in both AC and DC.

See the video below for an illustration of where these valves are used in RO systems.