Friday, April 29, 2016

Choose Guided Wave Radar for Your Challenging Process Level Application

Guided Wave Radar transmitters (GWR)
Guided Wave
Radar Transmitter
Courtesy of
Foxboro/Schneider
Electric
Designed to perform continuous level measurement in a wide range of industries and applications, Guided Wave Radar transmitters (GWR) are unaffected by changes in temperature, specific gravity, pressure and with no need to recalibrate, offering a highly available measurement at low maintenance cost. GWR transmitters provide level measurement solutions in a variety of process applications, providing a universal radar measurement solution for all liquids including corrosive, viscous, sticky and other difficult media such as foam and turbulent surfaces, and solids.

Electromagnetic pulses are emitted and guided along a probe.  These pulses are reflected back at the product surface.  The distance is calculated by measuring this transit time. This device is perfect for high-end applications.  It is suitable for applications with foam, dust, vapor, agitated, turbulent or boiling surfaces with rapid level changes.

Common features include:
Easy configuration via digital communication; Wide selection of materials facilitates service under harsh/corrosive conditions; Solutions for density/pressure variations and rapid level changes; Empty Tank Spectrum filtering; Quick Noise scanning reduces false radar reflections.

Applications: Steam Generation /Boiler Drum; Oil/Water Separator; BioDiesel Production; Overflow Protection; Interface and Density; Process tanks; Storage tanks; Polyester/Nylon fiber production; Claus Process


For more information on Guided Wave Radar level instruments, contact:

Mead O'Brien
(800) 892-2769
www.meadobrien.com

Friday, April 15, 2016

Part 3: What Steam Is, How Steam is Used, and the Properties of Steam

Mead O'Brien Steam Experts
Mead O'Brien Steam Experts
Steam is the gaseous phase (state) of water and has many domestic, commercial, and industrial uses. There are two categories of steam - wet steam and dry steam. In dry steam, all the water molecules stay in the gaseous state. In wet steam, some of the water molecules have released their energy (latent heat) and begin condensing into water droplets.

Steam, usually created by a boiler burning coal or other fuels, became the primary source of energy for mechanical movement during the industrial revolution, ultimately being replaced by fossil fuels and electricity.

Steam has many commercial and industrial uses. In agricultural, steam is used to remediate and sterilize soil. In power generation, approximately 90% of our electricity is created using steam as the working fluid to spin turbines. Autoclaves use steam for sterilization in microbiology labs, research, and healthcare facilities. Many commercial and industrial pieces of equipment are cleaned with steam. Finally, commercial complexes, campuses and military buildings use steam for heat and humidification.

The following video, the FINAL part of a three part series titled “What Steam Is, How Steam is Used, and the Properties of Steam” provides the viewer with an exceptional basis to build from. Special thanks to Armstrong International who created the original work.



For more information on any industrial or commercial steam application, contact:

Mead O'Brien, Inc.
(800) 892-2769

Monday, April 11, 2016

Part 2: What Steam Is, How Steam is Used, and the Properties of Steam

Use of Steam
Steam is the gaseous phase (state) of water and has many domestic, commercial, and industrial uses. There are two categories of steam - wet steam and dry steam. In dry steam, all the water molecules stay in the gaseous state. In wet steam, some of the water molecules have released their energy (latent heat) and begin condensing into water droplets.

Steam, usually created by a boiler burning coal or other fuels, became the primary source of energy for mechanical movement during the industrial revolution, ultimately being replaced by fossil fuels and electricity.

Steam has many commercial and industrial uses. In agricultural, steam is used to remediate and sterilize soil. In power generation, approximately 90% of our electricity is created using steam as the working fluid to spin turbines. Autoclaves use steam for sterilization in microbiology labs, research, and healthcare facilities. Many commercial and industrial pieces of equipment are cleaned with steam. Finally, commercial complexes, campuses and military buildings use steam for heat and humidification.

The following video, the second part of a three part series titled “What Steam Is, How Steam is Used, and the Properties of Steam” provides the viewer with an exceptional basis to build from. Special thanks to Armstrong International who created the original work.



For more information on any industrial or commercial steam application, contact:

Mead O'Brien, Inc.
(800) 892-2769

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Part 1: What Steam Is, How Steam is Used, and the Properties of Steam

Steam is the gaseous phase (state) of water and has many domestic, commercial, and industrial uses. There are two categories of steam - wet steam and dry steam. In dry steam, all the water molecules stay in the gaseous state. In wet steam, some of the water molecules have released their energy (latent heat) and begin condensing into water droplets.

Steam, usually created by a boiler burning coal or other fuels, became the primary source of energy for mechanical movement during the industrial revolution, ultimately being replaced by fossil fuels and electricity.

Steam has many commercial and industrial uses. In agricultural, steam is used to remediate and sterilize soil. In power generation, approximately 90% of our electricity is created using steam as the working fluid to spin turbines. Autoclaves use steam for sterilization in microbiology labs, research, and healthcare facilities. Many commercial and industrial pieces of equipment are cleaned with steam. Finally, commercial complexes, campuses and military buildings use steam for heat and humidification.

The following video, the first part of a three part series titled “What Steam Is, How Steam is Used, and the Properties of Steam” provides the viewer with an exceptional basis to build from. Special thanks to Armstrong International who created the original work.


For more information on any industrial or commercial steam application, contact:

Mead O'Brien, Inc.
www.meadobrien.com
(800) 892-2769